CHS Character Focus: CYBER BULLYING
Posted On:
Friday, December 14, 2012
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What is Cyber Bullying?

Cyberbullying: The use of digital media tools such as the Internet and cell phones to deliberately upset or harass someone else.


  • Cyberbullying can happen 24/7, whereas regular bullying generally stops when kids go home.
  • Cyberbullying is often very public. Posts can spread rapidly and to a large, invisible audience because of the nature of how information travels online.
  • Cyberbullies sometimes attack anonymously, whereas with traditional bullying it is often clear who the bully is. In-person bullying can cause physical and emotional harm, while cyberbullying causes only emotional harm (though it can lead to physical bullying later).The age and size of a person are often less important with cyberbullying because people are not face to face.  For example, even teachers can be targets.

 

What are some words or phrases to describe how it feels to be cyberbullied?

Embarrassed, upset, depressed, hurt, powerless, frozen with fear


How is cyberbullying the same and/or different than in-person bullying?

Cyberbullying is a form of bullying, but that cyberbullying often spreads faster, further, to more people, and can occur 24/7.


Similarities: 

  • Both can make kids feel uncomfortable, embarrassed, helpless, sad, and angry.


Differences: 

  • Kids often use more hurtful and extreme language online than offline.
  • Cyberbullying can happen 24/7, whereas regular bullying generally stops when kids go home.
  • Cyberbullying is often very public. Posts can spread rapidly and to a large, invisible audience because of the nature of how information travels.
  • Cyberbullies sometimes attack anonymously, whereas with traditional bullying it is often clear who the bully is.
  • In-person bullying can cause physical and emotional harm, while cyberbullying causes only emotional harm (though it can lead to physical bullying later).

How to Handle Cyber Bullying...

 

  • Sign off the computer. It’s best to ignore the attacks and walk away from the cyberbully.
  • Don’t respond or retaliate. If you are angry and reply, then you might say nasty things. Cyberbullies often just want to get a reaction out of you, so don’t let them know that their plan has worked.
  • Block the bully. If you get mean messages through IM or a social networking site, you should take the person off your buddy or friends list. You can also just delete messages from bullies without reading them.
  • Save and print bullying messages. These could be important evidence to show your parents or teachers if the bullying does not stop.
  • Talk to a friend. When someone makes you feel bad, sometimes it can help to talk the situation over with a friend.
  • Tell a trusted adult. (A trusted adult is someone who you believe will listen and has the skills, desire, and authority to help you.) Telling an adult isn’t tattling. It’s standing up for yourself. And even if the bullying occurs at home, your school probably has rules against it.
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